The Latest

Aug 19, 2014 / 4,895 notes

(via worldfam0us)

Don’t mistake my kindness for weakness. I’ll choke you with the same hand I fed you with.
Aug 19, 2014 / 68,915 notes

My family has always been private about our time spent together. It was our way of keeping one thing that was ours, with a man we shared with an entire world. But now that’s gone, and I feel stripped bare. My last day with him was his birthday, and I will be forever grateful that my brothers and I got to spend that time alone with him, sharing gifts and laughter. He was always warm, even in his darkest moments. While I’ll never, ever understand how he could be loved so deeply and not find it in his heart to stay, there’s minor comfort in knowing our grief and loss, in some small way, is shared with millions. It doesn’t help the pain, but at least it’s a burden countless others now know we carry, and so many have offered to help lighten the load. Thank you for that.

To those he touched who are sending kind words, know that one of his favorite things in the world was to make you all laugh. As for those who are sending negativity, know that some small, giggling part of him is sending a flock of pigeons to your house to poop on your car. Right after you’ve had it washed. After all, he loved to laugh too…

Dad was, is and always will be one of the kindest, most generous, gentlest souls I’ve ever known, and while there are few things I know for certain right now, one of them is that not just my world, but the entire world is forever a little darker, less colorful and less full of laughter in his absence. We’ll just have to work twice as hard to fill it back up again.

My only statement. My brothers’ are also online. Thank you for all your kindness, and goodbye for awhile guys. xo (via zeldawilliams)
Aug 14, 2014 / 38,904 notes
stormtrooperfashion:

Dimphy Janse in “Die Neuen Sixties” by Kostas Avgoulis for ELLE Germany, August 2014
Aug 4, 2014 / 160 notes

stormtrooperfashion:

Dimphy Janse in “Die Neuen Sixties” by Kostas Avgoulis for ELLE Germany, August 2014

Aug 4, 2014 / 90 notes

phattygirls:

DON’T TOUCH RIHANNA’S BOOTY!

(via his-high-ness)

hittings:

"The most painful goodbyes are the ones that are never said and never explained."
Little Birds (2012)
Aug 4, 2014 / 27,152 notes

hittings:

"The most painful goodbyes are the ones that are never said and never explained."

Little Birds (2012)

(via highwithlana)

phattygirls:

"Pronounce my name right!"
Aug 4, 2014 / 63 notes

phattygirls:

"Pronounce my name right!"

(via his-high-ness)

fuckyeahdarkextropian:

The robocar might create something akin to a “neighbourhood elevator.” Imagine a house 3/4 of a mile from the local cool street. In the house is a button. You might press the button and go out. Not that long after you get to the curb, a small robocar pulls up. This is a simple, low-speed model that only goes 30mph. It doesn’t have seatbelts, and is tall and not very aerodynamic. You might just stand in it, rather than sit. You get in and it starts heading towards your neighbourhood center. If you like, you tell it a more specific destination along the street and it takes you there.
Without belts or low seats, you step out quickly when you arrive in just under 3 minutes. You walk the street, picking up items you like to shop for in person, chatting with friends, perhaps pausing in a cafe to take in the scene. When you are ready, even though you are at the other end of the street, you push a button (this time in your phone) and in short order the “elevator” arrives and you step in to get back home.
This ride probably is free to you, or certainly very cheap. The vehicles are simple and not expensive, and either the businesses along that street or your own neighbourhood association are probably quite glad to pay for them to get your custom. Most importantly, it’s as seamless and easy as riding an elevator in a condo tower or a high density area.
It could get even more seamless. Imagine all you do is walk out of your home and start heading up the street towards the neighbourhood. Your phone notices you are doing this, and in well under a minute the neighbourhood shuttle slows down to match your pace. If you don’t get in, or wave it off, not much energy is wasted, and you go on your way. Otherwise you step in and are soon shopping. When you head back out from that street, your phone probably figures out your needs even faster — you don’t have to do a thing. This gives you a little more exercise and more closely emulates having a house one block away.
This seamless experience could make a very large area — 2 or more square miles — feel just as close to the walkable space as the houses that are “steps” from it. This in turn will both raise the value of the more remote houses and possibly slightly drop the value of the really close ones who lose a bit of their advantage. (In fact they are noisier so they may lose more of it.) The merchants get a big win with a lot more people who find it trivial to shop this way.
Aug 4, 2014 / 136 notes

fuckyeahdarkextropian:

The robocar might create something akin to a “neighbourhood elevator.” Imagine a house 3/4 of a mile from the local cool street. In the house is a button. You might press the button and go out. Not that long after you get to the curb, a small robocar pulls up. This is a simple, low-speed model that only goes 30mph. It doesn’t have seatbelts, and is tall and not very aerodynamic. You might just stand in it, rather than sit. You get in and it starts heading towards your neighbourhood center. If you like, you tell it a more specific destination along the street and it takes you there.

Without belts or low seats, you step out quickly when you arrive in just under 3 minutes. You walk the street, picking up items you like to shop for in person, chatting with friends, perhaps pausing in a cafe to take in the scene. When you are ready, even though you are at the other end of the street, you push a button (this time in your phone) and in short order the “elevator” arrives and you step in to get back home.

This ride probably is free to you, or certainly very cheap. The vehicles are simple and not expensive, and either the businesses along that street or your own neighbourhood association are probably quite glad to pay for them to get your custom. Most importantly, it’s as seamless and easy as riding an elevator in a condo tower or a high density area.

It could get even more seamless. Imagine all you do is walk out of your home and start heading up the street towards the neighbourhood. Your phone notices you are doing this, and in well under a minute the neighbourhood shuttle slows down to match your pace. If you don’t get in, or wave it off, not much energy is wasted, and you go on your way. Otherwise you step in and are soon shopping. When you head back out from that street, your phone probably figures out your needs even faster — you don’t have to do a thing. This gives you a little more exercise and more closely emulates having a house one block away.

This seamless experience could make a very large area — 2 or more square miles — feel just as close to the walkable space as the houses that are “steps” from it. This in turn will both raise the value of the more remote houses and possibly slightly drop the value of the really close ones who lose a bit of their advantage. (In fact they are noisier so they may lose more of it.) The merchants get a big win with a lot more people who find it trivial to shop this way.

(via futurescope)

And when you choose a life partner, you’re choosing a lot of things, including your parenting partner and someone who will deeply influence your children, your eating companion for about 20,000 meals, your travel companion for about 100 vacations, your primary leisure time and retirement friend, your career therapist, and someone whose day you’ll hear about 18,000 times.
Aug 4, 2014 / 34,997 notes
arcticdiscos:

 Sylvia Plath. 1932-1963
 “I can never read all the books I want; I can never be all the people I  want and live all the lives I want. I can never train myself in all the  skills I want. And why do I want? I want to live and feel all the shades,  tones and variations of mental and physical experience possible in  life. And I am horribly limited.” 
Aug 4, 2014 / 48,103 notes

arcticdiscos:

 Sylvia Plath. 1932-1963

 “I can never read all the books I want; I can never be all the people I  want and live all the lives I want. I can never train myself in all the  skills I want. And why do I want? I want to live and feel all the shades,  tones and variations of mental and physical experience possible in  life. And I am horribly limited.” 

(via leaninandkissme)

Jul 25, 2014 / 14,893 notes
Jul 25, 2014 / 2,194 notes

(via lanafan)

Jul 25, 2014 / 10,877 notes
tierdropp:

Sonya
Jul 25, 2014 / 869 notes

tierdropp:

Sonya

Jul 25, 2014 / 16,057 notes

(via jedi--kitten)